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Family Games

Family Board Games are typically fun with a family, more players can play than other categories. These encourage family interaction and are generally aged a little higher than the children's games

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  1. Ticket To Ride

    Ticket To Ride

    1 Review(s)

    With elegantly simple gameplay, Ticket to Ride can be learned in under 15 minutes, while providing players with intense strategic and tactical decisions every turn. Players collect cards of various types of train cars they then use to claim railway routes in North America. The longer the routes, the more points they earn. Additional points come to those who fulfill Destination Tickets ヨ goal cards that connect distant cities; and to the player who builds the longest continuous route.

    "The rules are simple enough to write on a train ticket ヨ each turn you either draw more cards, claim a route, or get additional Destination Tickets," says Ticket to Ride author, Alan R. Moon. "The tension comes from being forced to balance greed ヨ adding more cards to your hand, and fear ヨ losing a critical route to a competitor."

    Ticket to Ride continues in the tradition of Days of Wonder's big format board games featuring high-quality illustrations and components including: an oversize board map of North America, 225 custom-molded train cars, 144 illustrated cards, and wooden scoring markers.

    Since its introduction and numerous subsequent awards, Ticket to Ride has become the BoardGameGeek epitome of a "gateway game" -- simple enough to be taught in a few minutes, and with enough action and tension to keep new players involved and in the game for the duration.

    Part of the Ticket to Ride series.

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  2. Kingdom Builder

    Kingdom Builder

    In Kingdom Builder, the players create their own kingdoms by skillfully building their settlements, aiming to earn the most gold at the end of the game.

    Nine different kinds of terrain are on the variable game board, including locations and castles. During his turn, a player plays his terrain card and builds three settlements on three hexes of this kind. If possible, a new settlement must be built next to one of that playerメs existing settlements. When building next to a location, the player may seize an extra action tile that he may use from his next turn on. These extra actions allow extraordinary actions such as moving your settlements.

    By building next to a castle, the player will earn gold at the end of the game, but the most gold will be earned by meeting the conditions of the three Kingdom Builder cards; these three cards (from a total of ten in the game) specify the conditions that must be met in order to earn the much-desired gold, such as earning gold for your settlements built next to water hexes or having the majority of settlements in a sector of the board.

    Each game, players will use a random set of Kingdom Builder cards (3 of 10), special actions (4 of 8), and terrain sectors to build the map (4 of 8), ensuring you won't play the same game twice!

    Kingdom Builder FAQ - please read before posting questions in the forum.

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  3. Money!

    Money!

    The object of this Reiner Knizia card game is to collect as many of one type of currency as possible. Players bid cards from their hands to exchange for 'lots' of cards, with the order being determined by whoever put out the highest valued cards. The cards themselves are renditions of currencies from around the world.

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  4. Monopoly

    Monopoly

    Theme
    Players take the part of land owners, attempting to buy and then develop their land. Income is gained by other players visiting their properties and money is spent when they visit properties belonging to other players. When times get tough, players may have to mortgage their properties to raise cash for fines, taxes and other misfortunes.

    Gameplay
    On his turn, a player rolls two dice and moves that number of spaces around the board. If the player lands on an as-yet-unowned property, he has the opportunity to buy it and add it to his portfolio or allow the bank to auction it to the highest bidder. If a player owns all the spaces within a color group, he may then build houses and hotels on these spaces, generating even more income from opponents who land there. If he lands on a property owned by another player, he must pay that player rent according to the value of the land and any buildings on it. There are other places on the board which can not be bought, but instead require the player to draw a card and perform the action on the card, pay taxes, collect income, or even go to jail.

    Goal
    The goal of the game is to be the last player remaining with any money.

    Cultural impact on rules
    Monopoly is unusual in that the game has official, printed rules, but most players learn how to play from others, never actually learning the correct way to play. This has led to the canonization of a number of house rules that make the game more palatable to children (and sore losers) but harm the gameplay by preventing players from going bankrupt or slowing down the rate of property acquisition. One common house rule has players put any money paid to the bank in the center of the board, which jackpot a player may earn by landing on Free Parking. This prevents the game from removing money from play, and since players collect $200 each time they pass Go, this results in ever-increasing bankrolls and players surviving rents that should have bankrupted them. Another house rule allows players to take "loans" from the bank instead of going bankrupt, which means the game will never end. Some house rules arise out of ignorance rather than attempts to improve the game. For instance, many players don't know that properties landed on but left unbought go up for auction, and even some that know to auction don't know that the bidding starts at $1, meaning a player may pay well below the listed price for an auctioned property.

    Background
    In the USA in 1933, Charles Darrow devised Monopoly based on an earlier game by Elizabeth J. Magie. The patent was filed 31st August 1935 while the game was on sale in America. Based on an earlier game, The Landlord's Game, it was at first rejected by Parker Bros., as being too complicated to be a success. How wrong could they be! It came to the UK in 1936, made under licence by Waddingtons. Darrow died in 1967 having realised he had developed one of the most successful board games of all times. It was awarded as Game of the Century by the TRA (Toy Retailers Association).

    Monopoly was patented in 1935 by Charles Darrow and released by Parker Brothers. The game was actually one of a number of variants in existence at the time, all of which date back to an earlier, 1904 game by Elizabeth J. Magie called The Landlord's Game. Magie was a proponent of the Single Tax put forth by famous author Henry George. The game was designed to show the evils of earning money from renting land (as it leads to the destitution of all but one player) and the virtues of the proposed Single Tax - players could choose to play under regular rules or alternate "Single Tax" rules.

    The game didn't really go anywhere and Magie lost interest in it. Variations of the game evolved, however, and homemade versions traveled up and down the Atlantic coast and even as far west as Michigan and Texas, being developed all along the way. Eventually the game was noticed by Charles Darrow, who introduced it to the world in its current form.

    Re-implements:

    Expanded by:
    Official

    Unofficial

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  5. Metropolys

    Metropolys

    Talented Urban planners and architects rival each other to construct luxury, elegant buildings of glass and steel, defying the laws of balance. Who will eventually impose their style to leave an indelible trail in the history of the city? The answer is in your hands!

    The players are urban planners in quest of prestige. Over the course of the game, players will try to construct their buildings in the best locations. As soon as a player has placed all of their buildings, the game ends. The player with the most prestige is the winner.

    Each turn a player will pick a space on the board and place one of their buildings (bidding markers) into the space, with the bidding number shown. Each following player can then either pass or raise the bid by placing a higher numbered building into an adjacent space. The eventual winner of the bid flips his building number side down and all losing bids are returned to players. A new round commences.

    Spaces on the board are differentiated by Metro spaces, which are worth points and reward the player with the most at game end; archaeological sites, which are worth minus points and penalize the player who most recently built on one; and fashionable locations, which are just worth extra points. In addition, each player has up to two hidden agendas that they are secretly trying to achieve, such as trying to surround water fountains or occupy both sides of bridges.

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  6. Looting London

    Looting London

    London has been looted! Five of its rarest treasures have been stolen on the same night: one of the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London, gold reserves from the Bank of England, top secret files from Big Ben, a priceless Incan artifact from the British Museum, and a Van Gogh from the National Gallery. You are a famous London sleuth; can you interview the four witnesses, gather their clues, apprehend the thieves and recover the loot?

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  7. Lord of the Fries

    Lord Of The Fries

    Game Synopsis: Lord of the Fries is a thematic sequel to Give Me The Brain!. It takes place at the same restaurant, has the same cast of characters, and requires roughly the same equipment. But the game is entirely different.
    Players choose orders (sometimes randomly, sometime not) from the figuratively colorful Friedey's menu, and try to fill them with cards from their hands. Some orders are easy, like the Cowabunga. One Cow Meat, one Bun. Some are a little harder, like the Chickabunga Conga: same as a Chickabunga (Bird Meat plus Bun), plus Fries and a Drink. Sound easy? Now try your hand at a Lord of the Fries, a Meat Munch, or the infamous Patriarch (Fish Meat, Cheese, Bun, Fries, Drink, and the oft-maligned Strawberry Pie).

    Awards

    1998 Origins Award Nominee: Best Traditional Card Game
    2003 Listed in GAMES Magazine's GAMES 100

    Online Play

    Versions

    • 1998 cardstock version (out of print)
    • 2003 Special Edition (color) as Lord of the Fries De-lux
    • 2008 Third Edition (color)

    Third Edition card count - 12 Drink, 12 Bun, 12 Fries, 12 Veggies, 12 Cow, 10 Bird, 8 Cheese, 8 Sauce, 8 Fish, 4 Pie

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  8. Lords of Vegas

    Lords Of Vegas

    You and your opponents represent powerful developers in a burgeoning Nevada city. You will earn money and prestige by building the biggest and most profitable casinos on "The Strip," the town's backbone of dust and sin. You start with nothing but parking lots and dreams, but from there you build, sprawl, reorganize and gamble your way to victory. Score the most points investing in the most profitable development companies and putting the best bosses in control of the richest casinos. Put your dollars on the line . . . it's time to roll!

    The game board is broken into 8 different areas, each consisting of a number of empty 'lots'. Players build lots by paying money and placing a die of the value matching the one shown on the lot's space onto the lot, along with a casino tile of one of 7 colors. Adjoining lots of the same color are considered a single casino. The casino's boss is the player whose die value is higher than any other in the casino. On each players turn, players turn over a new card representing a new lot they get. The card also is one of the casino colors. Any built casinos of the matching color will score both money and VP. Money is earned for each lot in the casino, where each lot may be owned by a different player. VP goes only to the casino's owner. Players can expand their casinos; try to take over casinos owned by other players; make deals to trade lots, casinos and money; or gamble in opponents' casinos to make more money. Ultimately, though, only victory points matter, and that means making yourself boss of the biggest casinos.

    Lords of Vegas contains:

    • Snazzy game board
    • 4 turn summaries
    • 55 cards
    • 40 chips in 4 colors
    • 48 dice in 4 colors
    • 4 poker chips
    • Lots of money
    • 45 casino blocks
    • Rules
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  9. The Magic Labyrinth

    The Magic Labyrinth

    The little magician apprentices have lost some magic objects inside of the masterメs maze. Now they try to collect them before the Master notices anything. However, in the maze there are invisible walls and only one of the missing objects is revealed at a time. So they have to make their way through the maze by means of a good memory and lots of skill.

    Each player moves their magician over the board while trying not to bump the labyrinth below. Each magician is joined with a magnetic ball so if you hit a wall the ball drops and you have to start all over again.

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  10. Master Labyrinth

    Master Labyrinth

    While this 2007 dragon-themed edition of the Ravensburger Labyrinth Games has the same name as its 1991 wizard-bearing progenitor (see Master Labyrinth), there are major differences.

    This edition lacks the wands and formula cards found in the previous version, but it adds a dragon figurine, two gargoyle-like "guardian" pawns, dice, and coins.

    While the game is still fundamentally about manipulating and navigating a maze to collect treasures, it adds dice-driven combat and an additional means of scoring via collecting coins.

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