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  1. Through the Ages: A Story of Civilization


  2. Ticket to Ride: Europe

    Ticket To Ride: Europe

    Ticket to Ride: Europe takes you on a new train adventure across Europe. From Edinburgh to Constantinople and from Lisbon to Moscow, you'll visit great cities of turn-of-the-century Europe. Like the original Ticket to Ride, the game remains elegantly simple, can be learned in 5 minutes, and appeals to both families and experienced gamers. Ticket to Ride: Europe is a complete, new game and does not require the original version.

    More than just a new map, Ticket to Ride: Europe features brand new gameplay elements. Tunnels may require you to pay extra cards to build on them, Ferries require locomotive cards in order to claim them, and Stations allow you to sacrifice a few points in order to use an opponents route to connect yours. The game also includes larger format cards and Train Station game pieces.

    The overall goal remains the same, collect and play train cards in order to place your pieces on the board, attempting to connect cities on your ticket cards. Points are earned both from placing trains and completing tickets but uncompleted tickets lose you points. The player who has the most points at the end of the game wins.

    Copyright 2002-2014 Days of Wonder, inc.

    Part of the Ticket to Ride series.

    Online Play

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  3.  Ticket to Ride: Nordic Countries

    Ticket To Ride: Nordic Countries

    Ticket to Ride: Nordic Countries takes you on a Nordic adventure through Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden as you travel to the great northern cities of Copenhagen, Oslo, Helsinki, and Stockholm. This version was initially available only in the Nordic Countries of Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Finland; a worldwide limited-edition release occurred in August 2008 and it has since been kept in print again by Days of Wonder.

    The goal in "Nordic" remains the same as base Ticket to Ride: collect and play cards to place your trains on the board, attempting to connect the different cities on your ticket cards. The map incorporates tunnels from Europe and also has routes containing ferries. Ferries will require a certain number of Locomotives to be played, as well as other cards, in order to be claimed. Locomotives are handled a bit differently as well. On your turn you may take 2 Locomotives if you want, but you can only use them on ferries, tunnels, or the special 9 length route.

    Unlike the USA or Europe maps, Nordic is designed for 2-3 players only and has a heavier focus on blocking your opponent and more aggressive play.

    Part of the Ticket to Ride series.

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  4. Tichu

    Tichu

    Tichu is a partnership climbing card game, and the object of play is to rid yourself of your hand, preferably while scoring points in the process.

    The deck is a standard 52-card pack with four special cards added: dog, phoenix, dragon and Mah Jong (1). When it's your turn, you may either beat the current top card combination ラ single card, pair of cards, sequence of pairs, full house, etc. ラ or pass. If play passes all the way back to the player who laid the top cards, he wins the trick, clears the cards, and can lead the next one. The card led determines the only combination of cards that can be played on that trick, so if a single card is led, then only single cards are played; if a straight of seven cards is led, then only straights of seven cards can be played, etc.

    The last player out in a round gives all the cards he won to the player who exited first, and the last player's unplayed cards are handed to the opposite team. Fives, tens and Kings are worth 5, 10 and 10 points, with each hand worth one hundred points without bonuses ラ but the bonuses are what drive the game. At the start of a round, each player can call "Tichu" prior to her playing any card. This indicates that she thinks that she can empty her hand first this round; if she does so, her team scores 100 points, and if not, it loses 100 points. Cards are dealt at the start of a round in a group of eight and a group of six; a player can call "Grand Tichu" after looking at only her first eight cards for a ᄆ200 point bonus. If both players on a team exit a round prior to either player on the opposite team, then no points are scored for cards and the winning team earns 200 points (with Tichu/Grand Tichu bonuses and penalties being applied as normal).

    The first team to 1,000 points wins.

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  5. Imperial

    Imperial

    Europe is in the age of imperialism. Internationally operating financial investors aim for the highest political influence in Europe. Great Britain, German Reich, Russian Empire, Austria-Hungary, Kingdom of Italy, and Republic of France are each controlled by different investors. The six imperial nations build factories, troops and fleets to expand their power in Europe. They collect taxes from occupied regions to pay interests to their investors. As financial control over the imperial nations changes, there are always new strategic alliances and conflicts emerging between them.

    The players represent internationally operating investors who stay in the background. There are always six imperial nations acting in the game, no matter how many investors take part. Only the investor who gets the best return on his investments, who controls the most powerful imperial nations, and who shows the best diplomatic skill, may win the game!

    Imperial is a challenging strategy game without any luck of cards or dice. Players take over the role of internationally operating financial investors and control European diplomacy in imperial times.

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  6. Imperial 2030

    Imperial 2030

    Imperial 2030 is a game on its own, based on the rules of Imperial. The six powers (USA, Europe, Russia, China, India, and Brazil) develop their industrial basis and build up armies and fleets. They fight over control of neutral land and sea areas in order to become the most powerful nation worldwide.

    In this game it is not the players who take turns, but the six powers, one after another. The players are just internationally operating investors who act in the background. By giving money to the six powers, which all have their own treasuries, the players influence the politics. The biggest investor in each nation gains control of that nation's government and decides what the nation will do. As control of a government can change with each new investment, players may control several governments at the same time. As investors, players should not get too attached to their preferred nation, but rather focus on where their investments have the best rates of return. Essentially the game is about money, and not about military domination!

    Imperial 2030 was released at Essen 2009 by PD-Games and Rio Grande Games. Compared to "Imperial" there will be some new features:
    - new wooden bits
    - the Swiss Bank
    - a new 30 million bond to invest in
    - more neutral territory, generating higher taxation
    - fewer home provinces
    - control of canals (Panama and Suez).

    For those who already owned Imperial, there was the opportunity to get only the new map and bonds at Essen '09, as it can be played with the old wooden bits as well.

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  7. Go

    Go: The Board Game

    By all appearances, it's just two players taking turns laying stones on a 19�19 (or smaller) grid of intersections. But once its basic rules are understood, Go shows its staggering depth. One can see why many people say it's one of the most elegant brain-burning abstract games in history, with players trying to claim territory by walling off sections of the board and surrounding each other's stones. The game doesn't end until the board fills up, or, more often, when both players agree to end it, at which time whoever controls the most territory wins.

    The earliest mention of Go (?? (w�i q�)- "surrounding game") appears in the "Analects" of Confucius (551-479 BC), while the earliest physical evidence is a 17�17 Go board discovered in 1952 in a tomb of the former Han dynasty (206 BC- 9 AD). There is a tangle of conflicting popular and scholarly anecdotes attributing its invention to two Chinese emperors, an imperial vassal and court astrologers. One story has it that Go was invented by the legendary Emperor Yao (ruled 2357-2256 BC) as an amusement for his idiot son. A second claims that the Emperor Shun (ruled 2255-2205 BC) created the game in hopes of improving his weak-minded son's mental prowess. A third says the person named Wu, a vassal of the Emperor Jie (ruled 1818-1766 BC), invented Go (as well as games of cards). Finally, a fourth story suggests that Go was developed by court astrologers during the Zhou dynasty (1045-255 BC).

    A Go set, consisting of a very general-purpose grid and colored stones, can also be used to play a variety of other abstract strategy games, such as Connect6, Go-Moku, Pente, and others.

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  8. Galaxy Trucker

    Galaxy Trucker

    In a galaxy far, far away... they need sewer systems, too. Corporation Incorporated builds them. Everyone knows their drivers -- the brave men and women who fear no danger and would, if the pay was good enough, even fly through Hell.

    Now you can join them. You will gain access to prefabricated spaceship components cleverly made from sewer pipes. Can you build a space ship durable enough to weather storms of meteors? Armed enough to defend against pirates? Big enough to carry a large crew and valuable cargo? Fast enough to get there first?

    Of course you can. Become a Galaxy Trucker. It's loads of fun.

    Galaxy Trucker is a tile laying game that plays out over two phases: building and flying. The goal is to have the most credits at the end of the game. You can earn credits by delivering goods, defeating pirates, building an efficient ship, and being the furthest along the track at the end of the flying phase.

    Building happens in real time and has players build their personal space ships by grabbing tiles from the middle of the table before the timer runs out. Tiles start out facedown so they won't know what they have until they take it, but they may choose to return it faceup if they don't want it. They must place the tiles they keep in a legal manner in their space ship. Usually this just means lining up the connectors appropriately (single to single, double to double, universal to anything) but also includes proper positioning of guns and engines. Tiles represent a variety of things including guns, engines, storage containers, crew cabins, shields, and batteries. They may also peek at the cards they will encounter in phase 2, but they must sacrifice building time to do this. At any time player's may call their ships finished and take an order marker from the center.

    Once building is completed, and ships have been checked for errors, the flight begins. The flight cards are shuffled and player markers are placed on the flight board according to the order markers taken. Cards are revealed one at a time and player's interact with them in order. They may include things such as pirates, abandoned vessels, disease outbreaks, meteor showers, worlds with goods to pick up, player-on-player combat zones, and other various things.

    Most of the cards will cause players to move back on the flight track and they must decide if the delay is worth their efforts. When all the cards are encountered players sell any goods they have collected, collect their rewards for finishing in first, second, or third place or having the most intact ship, and then lose some credits for damaged components. Space can be a very dangerous place and it is not uncommon to see your ship break into smaller and smaller pieces or lose some very valuable cargo off the side. If your ship gets damaged too much you can get knocked out of the race so be careful!

    3 rounds of this are done, and in each round player's get a bigger board to build a ship that can hold more components. After the 3rd round the player with the most credits wins!

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  9. Earth Reborn

    Earth Reborn

    After 500 years, two factions emerge from their underground cities into a new world, an Earth reborn from nuclear disaster.

    12 highly detailed miniatures represent the two factions which are:

    NORAD: military in thinking and origins. Scientists, engineers, add to their strength.

    SALEMITES: occultists working with cadavers, bringing the dead to life.

    Soon after emerging, these two factions meet - and it is determined that they cannot live together in peace.

    Earth Reborn offers nine scenarios that take you through missions of rescue, retrieval, and escort through areas of labs, mansions, towns, and more. Each scenario builds upon the rules of a new chapter: the game system is built like a tutorial. There are core rules to start the game, and each chapter offers 1-3 new rules along with a scenario that uses these new rules.

    The game also contains the innovative S.A.G.S. (Scenario Auto Generating System), where 2-4 players can make their own maps and mission objectives for near infinite replayability!

    Other features include:

    1. A Tetris-like board construction using polyomino floor tiles.
    2. An order tiles system to give commands to your miniatures.
    3. Interrupt Duels with Bluff, betting command points to interrupt an enemy character and act during another player's turn.
    4. The I.P.S. (Iconographic Phrasing System) that allows almost any effect to occur with icons, totally language independent.
    5. Colored base arcs on miniatures to simplify Line of Sight, shooting, and close combat. It also multiplies charactersメ variations and possibilities.
    6. The Search rule, giving a visceral feeling to searching in rooms to find equipment.
    7. A Mission Points track that also serves as a Morale Points track.
    8. Radio Scrambling to mess with your opponents' orders.
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  10. Dungeon Lords

    Dungeon Lords

    In Dungeon Lords, you are an evil dungeonlord who is trying to build the best dungeon out there. You hire monsters, build rooms, buy traps and defeat the do-gooders who wish to bring you down.

    From the publisher's webpage:

    Have you ever ventured with party of heroes to conquer dungeons, gain pride, experiences and of course rich treasure? And has it ever occurred to you how hard it actually is to build and manage such underground complex filled with corridors and creatures? No? Well now you can try. Put yourself in role of the master of underground, summon your servants, dig complex of tunnels and rooms, set traps, hire creatures and try to stop filthy heroes from conquering and plundering your precious creation. We can guarantee you will look on dark corners, lairs and their inhabitant from completely different perspective!

    Each turn, players use a hand of cards to choose where to place their worker. Actions vary from mining gold, hiring monsters, buying traps etc. Each action has three spots available - with each spot having different effects (e.g. mining gold lets you mine more gold in each spot).
    When using the cards, two cards will become locked and will not be able to be used next turn.

    There are 4 turns to place actions for each game "year" and two game years in a whole game.
    Each turn is identified as a "season". Each season, players will get to see the heroes and events to come in the following season. Thus allowing them to prepare.

    At the end of each season (after the first), heroes will be allocated to each player according to their level of evil. Heroes range from mighty heroes to sneaky thieves. Each hero has their own power for which the player needs to prepare for.
    Finally, at the end of each year, the heroes will travel down into the dungeon to fight.

    Scoring in the game is based upon what you have built, the monsters you have hired and the heroes you have captured.

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